Reading:
Writing a Student-Centered Syllabus that Saves You Time

Writing a Student-Centered Syllabus that Saves You Time

retro
July 22, 2019

Writing a Student-Centered Syllabus that Saves You Time - Books and a tablet on a classroom desk

The trend toward student-centered learning is pedagogically sound, but it can also be incredibly time consuming for instructors. It takes time to consider the needs of individual students, plan activities that facilitate their independent work, and produce classroom experiences that get the best from them. Student-centered learning starts with the syllabus. More than just a document that tells students what to do and when, the syllabus sets the stage for the class as a whole. How can we write a syllabus that centers students from the start? How can that syllabus also save us time, in spite of these time consuming pedagogical strategies?

In this webinar, Dr. Kate Drabinski shares student-centered syllabus design strategies that also save time—from day one until the end of the term.

Writing a Student-Centered Syllabus that Saves You Time

Sign up for our newsletter

Podcast episodes, articles, and offers right to your inbox to help you rock your interdisciplinary career

Our Privacy Policy


Related Stories

Writing and Publishing Your First Book - Wood desk with white keyboard, earbuds, and coffee cup
April 2, 2018

Writing and Publishing Your First Book

How to identify your audience, craft a strong frame, revise the argument, and find the best publisher for your first book/tenure book.

How to Write a Letter of Recommendation - Stack of handwritten letters
April 11, 2017

How to Write a Letter of Recommendation for a Student

How to write a letter of recommendation for a student, including figure out whether you can honestly endorse them, where to begin, and how to follow up.

Weekend Reading - Orange tabby cat wearing glasses reading from an open book
January 12, 2017

Weekend Reading: Becoming a Better Teacher

Teaching is at once a huge responsibility and one of the most maligned tasks in higher education. It is incredibly difficult but instructors are rarely given extensive guidance. So as the semester begins, we’ve been thinking and reading a lot about teaching: how to prepare, set boundaries and manage expectations.

Arrow-up